Caduceus - Earth before the Flood: Disappeared Continents and Civilizations

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Caduceus

Ancient signs and symbols

Caduceus  (from the Greek word “messenger” or “precursor” )  was worn by the god-healer of Mesopotamia (Eshmun?), Ancient Egyptian gods Anubis and sometimes Isis, the Greco-Roman god Hermes-Mercury, the Phoenician god Bal (Baal), the Sumerian goddess Ishtar along with other gods. In Christianity, the caduceus became an attribute of Sophia (Wisdom). On the ancient Orthodox icons she keeps it in his right hand.
There are quite a few interpretations of the meaning of the caduceus. It is considered as a key symbol, opening the limit between light and darkness, good and evil, life and death. In this the wings of the caduceus symbolize the ability to cross any borders (option - are the epitome of the spirit), rod - power over the forces of nature, double snake - opposite sides of dualism, which eventually should connect. Two snakes represent the coupling strength of the separation of good and evil, fire and water, etc.
It is believed that the rod is the world axis (option - the world tree), up and down which between Heaven and Earth, the gods moved intermediary. Caduceus worn as a sign of peace and protection  all the messengers, and it was their main attribute. Two snakes with their heads facing up symbolize in this case the evolution of the universe, two principles (like the Ying and Yang in Taoism) or interpreted as two mutually due process of evolutionary development of material forms and souls that govern material forms. Symmetrical arrangement of snakes and wings is evidence of the opposing forces balance and harmonious development of both low, solid, and the higher, spiritual level.
Snakes have also been associated with the cyclical nature's revival and restoration of the universal order when it is broken. Quite often they are equated to the symbol of wisdom. In Asia Minor tradition two snakes were a common symbol of fertility and in Mesopotamian tradition woven snakes were considered the epitome of god healer.
A symbol similar to caduceus was found in the ancient Indian monuments. In esoteric Buddhism, a rod of the caduceus symbolize an axis of the world, and a snake, the cosmic energy, Serpent Fire or Kundalini, traditionally represented by coiling at the base of the spine (the analog of world axis in a scale of the microcosm). Intertwining around a central axis, snakes joined at seven points, they are linked with the chakras. Kundalini sleeps in the basal chakra, and when in the result of evolution wakes up, goes through the spine in three ways: central, Shushumna, and two lateral, which form two intersecting spirals - Pingala (That's right, men's and active spiral), and Ida (left, ladies and passive ) .

Whatever the interpretation of the caduceus (both from above, and not mentioned in the paper) was not true, it is considered by most researchers to be one of the oldest symbols of creative power. Therefore, it was thought that owned the caduceus possessed all laws of knowledge that rule nature. 

Caduceus - a symbol of the unity of sun and moon gods (interpretation of A. Koltypin)


In such a conventional interpretation of the caduceus, is not reflected several of its most important features which I want to draw your attention to. These are:
- Outstretched wings, which are virtually indistinguishable from the wings of the above described symbol - winged disk of the sun, with its many varieties - fravahar, winged Ashur, Maat, Nehbet, Khepri, etc.;
- Knob of the staff that has the shape of the sun disk, sun disk bordered by moon or Ankh.

According to some researchers, a kind of the caduceus in ancient Egypt was a scepter topped with a sun disk bordered by moon . It is believed that the caduceus is the rod that supports both symbols of the Sun and the Moon.

- The composition of the caduceus, which is consistent with many images of the other ancient Egyptian symbol, Urey or Wadjet, uniting into one (often in different combinations) birds, snakes, and the sun bordered by the moon. Quite often, they are joined by another ancient Egyptian symbol, “the eye of Horus” (in Masonic symbolism it represents the all-seeing eye).
According to the majority of Egyptologists, winged Urey-cobra, or Urey in a kind of a cobra and
a bird, symbolize the unity of Lower and Upper Egypt.  According to the reconstruction in my book, "Earth before the Flood - the world of sorcerers and werewolves”, they were administered respectively by snakemen-amphibians and white gods (Apsaras), or globally, sun and moon gods. And being on both sides of the sun disk snakes meant balance (or equality) of counter forces.
In my opinion,
the caduceus is another symbolic image of the unity or union. In this case the rod corresponds to the world axis, which as if (seems to) supports the Sun and the Moon (or sky). Wings symbolize celestial or sun (white) gods, and snakes - moon (serpentine) gods. Sun gods are closer to the sky, sun, and moon goods - to the ground. Characteristically, the messengers between gods often have mixed origin. For example, Hermes was a son of the leader of the sun gods Zeus and the nymph (apparently, among snakemen-amphibians) Maya and according to many of his attributes (it was the god of theft and trade) did not match the sun gods.
This hierarchy of the sun and moon gods confirmed by legends of many people, which states that after the first great battle between them, which ended with the victory of white gods (according to my interpretation, taking place at the turn of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, 65.5 million years ago), white or sun gods settled on the surface of the Earth and Snakemen down under the ground. Simultaneously caduceus may be a symbolic representation of the unity of the underworld or land (snakes) and the surface of the Earth or Heaven (wings) that revolve around the world axis (the staff) and illuminated by the Moon and the Sun (Knob).


The section"Ancient Signs and Symbols"/Symbolic display of alliance of sun and moon or earth gods on the caduceus, winged sun and Wadjet

 
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